"It is easier to build a strong child than to repair a broken man." - Frederick Douglass

High Blood Pressure Is the Result of Poor Nutrition

blood pressure

High blood pressure or hypertension is a precursor of heart disease affecting 45 percent of adults in the U.S. Unfortunately, the “U.S. appears to lose ground in controlling high blood pressure” as the leading cause of heart disease, according to The American Heart Association. The 2008 World Health Organization data estimated that hypertension is responsible for 7.5 million deaths across the globe, a report says.

As the 11th wealthiest country globally, the U.S. only ranks the 35th out of 169 countries according to the 2019 Bloomberg Healthiest Country Index. Consequently, a new study suggests that life expectancy has been declining in America for three straight years.

Poor Nutrition Concern

Furthermore, a sedentary lifestyle and poor nutrition can cause many health problems. For instance, there are barriers to healthy eating like poor cooking skills or a busy lifestyle. Similarly, natural and organic products are highly-priced. As a result, more people choose microwave and fast food meals.

blood pressureThe statistics showing that one in three adults in the U.S. has high blood pressure is an alarming rate, indeed. Yet, in the absence of symptoms, many Americans do not know they have the disease. Thus, regular checkups can save lives. Early detection is key to prevention and management.

Supplements like Vitamin D, potassium, and magnesium can help reduce hypertension. Moreover, nothing beats regular exercise, good nutrition, and healthy lifestyle changes to keep blood pressure low.

New Drug Combination

Recently, a new combination drug called the “triple pill” could revolutionize hypertension treatment worldwide. Subsequently, the goal is to reduce 25 percent in blood pressure levels by 2025.

It is tough to change the dietary behavior the entire population is socially accustomed to. Similarly, there is no cure for high blood pressure. But, there’s treatment with lifestyle habits, dietary change, and medication to minimize a person’s risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke.

Written by Janet Grace Ortigas
Edited by Cathy Milne-Ware

Sources:

Medical News Today: New ‘triple pill’ could eliminate high blood pressure; Written by Maria Cohut, Ph.D., and Fact checked by Jasmin Collier
American Health Association: U.S. appears to lose ground in controlling high blood pressure, by Thor Christensen
CDC: Prevent High Blood Pressure

Featured and Top Image Courtesy of jlcampbell104’s Flickr Page – Creative Commons License
Inline Image Courtesy of Marcia O’Connor’s  Flickr Page – Creative Commons License

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