Teenagers’ Minds Are Not on School

Teenager

Teenagers’ minds are not on school. The only thing they are focusing on is money. According to “The Fiscal Times,” 80 percent of teenagers ages 13 to 17 are concerned with finding a good job. If someone asked them if they would rather work or go to school, a majority of youth would choose work over sitting at a desk learning something they believe is not important. For many, it seems school is boring and a waste of time. So, while in school, the only thing young people are thinking about is the fastest way to get out of the struggle.

The current generation of adults do not understand the pain teenagers experience. Adults feel teenagers are young, so they are not going through struggles, but that is not true. According to the “Very Well Family,” some teenagers have divorced parents, while others have to deal with violence inside and outside of school. Furthermore, some of them are being molested and cannot go to anyone to talk about their abuse, still others have parents that have a drug or a drinking problem. As a result of these experiences, some teenagers do not receive enough attention, which is the reason they act like clowns in class. Some students are bullied every day. Some have dealt with police assault. Girls are getting pregnant, and they have to drop out because they do not have the support they need to raise a child and go to school.

Adults need to understand teenagers need encouragement and motivation; they need to feel love and positive energy. If people keep showing them negative behaviors and outcomes, they will put out negative attitudes. According to “Home Schoolon,” teenagers want people to show them that they care, and they want to be noticed. When they act out in class, all they are saying is “help me.” Parents need to stop cursing at their teenagers and start listening to them. Parents need to stop going out every night when they have kids. On the other side of the spectrum, teachers need to stop worrying about money, and teach these kids. In some cases there are teachers sleeping in class, while others spend class time on their phones. Then there are the teachers who curse with the teenagers. Teachers act more like the students than adults.

”School feels like a prison.” Every day students post that on social media. Students need to feel welcomed at school, not like caged animals. The reason teenagers attend school is because it is a hang out spot, and when they cannot have sex at home, they go to school. They do everything but learn. Basically, school is nothing but something to do when they are bored at home. According to “Search Quotes,” teenagers do not like hard work. They hate thinking too hard, getting up early, seeing the same faces every day, and mostly, they simply hate the school.

Teenagers do not care or feel like they need to learn in school. They feel it is more about passing the class than actually learning. Some even cut class because they do not care. School is not the same anymore. Teachers do not make learning fun or do anything to encourage students to stay. According to “Natural Child Project” and Claude Monet, ”School always appeared to me like a prison, and never could I make up my mind to stay there, not even for four hours to a day.”

If everyone cares so much about these kids receiving an education, the best advice is to show them. According to the students at Malcolm X College, administrators need to start by firing the bad teachers and hiring some good teachers. Parents need to start being active in their children’s lives. Stop lecturing, and start listening. Stop using threats and work with them. Acknowledge the good with the bad. Teachers, when students act out, do not put them out or give up so easily; work with them. Also, teach in a different way. Make the work fun; change the learning style. Make it so students will want to go every day and not miss classes. If school is going to be hard and boring, students will not come. Everyone is complaining about students not attending or not focusing in school. Everybody needs to stop complaining; start looking at the problem, and change it.

Written By Tianna Wright

Sources:

Clalkbeat – President Winfrey? Here’s what we know about Oprah’s education outlook

Daniel Wong – What to do if your teen hates school, 15 strategies that work

Natural Child Project – Why don’t students like school?

The Fiscal Times – Teens Are More Worried About Money We Think

Featured Image and Top Image Courtesy of Denish C Flickr Page – Creative Commons License

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